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Hunt Destination: Moncks Corner, South Carolina, Nov. 21, 2011

November 15, 2011

This show may be heard  following its broadcast date by clicking on the following link:  http://webtalkradio.net/shows/hoveys-outdoor-adventures/. If it is not the current show, it is still  available as an archived show and on iTunes. 

  Moncks Corner in central Berkeley County, South Carolina, is the gateway to fishing and hunting opportunities in the Santee-Cooper Region. It is located  only 30 miles from Charleston and has access to abundant power, water and transportation resources making it a nearly ideal place for  industry,  businesses and  outdoor activities.  Individuals and retirees also enjoy the nearly limitless cultural opportunities offered in Charleston and nearby historic communities. 

  Elaine Morgan, Chief Executive Officer of the Berkeley Chamber of Commerce, gives an enthusiastic welcome to the Carolina Low Country and highlights the areas’ business, cultural, recreational and retirement-home possibilities. A 5th generation resident, she is well seeped in local history and culture. This includes the making of a Low Country Perlow, a distinctive rice-wild game dish which I cook and sample on the show using some “mystery meat” salvaged from my freezer.

 Morgan may be contacted at the Chamber via their website at www.berkeleysc.org, by E-mail at emorgan@bcoc.com or telephone at (843) 761-8238.  The Chamber is located in the historic 18th Century  Nesbitt   House located at 1004  Old Highway 52 near the intersection of  Dennis Blvd.  

General Francis Marion at the head of his rag-tag troops in a Carolina swamp as shown in a mural at Blacks Camp.

  Hunting and fishing opportunities are discussed with Kevin Davis, one of the owner of Black’s Camp which is a historic fishing-hunting camp located on nearby Lake Moultrie. This lake and Lake Marion to the northwest are connected by a canal that was dug when the lakes were formed during the early years of  World War II to provide power for war industries. Not only was this area significant because of its contribution to the war effort, it is historically important for the part it played during the Revolutionary War when Francis Marion, The Swamp Fox, conducted guerrila warfare against General Lord Cornwallis’ British and Loyalist troops which ultimately resulted in the general’s defeat at Yorktown, Virginia.

 General Moultrie, whose statue stands at Black’s Camp, was also a participant in this often

General Moultrie

bloody conflict. These  events were captured in spirit, if not in absolute fact, in Mel Gibson’s movie, “The Patriot.” A part of this movie was filmed in nearby Cypress Gardens and on other locations in South Carolina.

 Fishing opportunities discussed by Davis include record-size crappie,  shell crackers (red-eared sunfish), catfish and stripers from the lakes as well as his taking an alligator that weighed over 1,000 pounds. Hunts are also offered from the camp at the nearby Black Brier Hunting Preserve in addition to free-lance hunting on nearby Wildlife Management Areas. To contact Davis go to the camp’s website at www.blackscamp.com or call for room reservations at (843)753-2231. Guided fishing and hunting trips are available as well as restaurant and meeting accommodations for about 150 people.

  Although the deer that I and others hunted for three days on the Black Brier Hunting Preserve were not cooperative, I killed a small doe once I returned home to Georgia with  Cabellas’ Buffalo stainless steel .44-caliber percussion revolver using a round ball load and 40 grains of Hodgdon’s Triple Seven powder.  Felt Ox-Yoke Wonder Wad were used under the balls and  wax Wonder Seals over them.  This is a powerful load, and it is not recommended for brass-framed versions of this, or other,  percussion revolvers.

  

  The first shot on the moving deer hit high on the spine (above the hammer) and knocked it down. As it attempted to rise, I put a second shot through its heart.  These shots were taken while sitting on the ground.  Both were fired from a range of about 35 yards and completely penetrated the deer. Others using this round-ball load in this gun have killed deer weighing up to 130 pounds and hogs up to about 150 pounds. I do not know what the upper limit of this load is for double-lung shots on heavy whitetailed deer.

 This revolver shooting is documented in a series of seven YouTube videos on the Modern Percussion Revolver. The first of these, “Part 1. The Pistols” may be viewed at: http://youtu.be/PB0SYhonsqM.   On this series I introduce the pistols, load development, cleaning as well as using them for small and big game hunting.  Another revolver with big-game hunting potential is the now discontinued Ruger Old Army. This pistols shoots heavier bullets better than the Buffalo and develops over 500 ft. lbs. of muzzle energy. I am also attempting to take deer and other game with it. I have used it to shoot squirrels and to kill alligators in the past.

Wild Game Perlow

  Perlow cooking was undertaken using a medium-sized duck, sausage, deer backstraps, smoked wild-hog meat, onions, bell peppers, small hot red peppers and brown rice. This was cooked in a pressure cooker and yielded a first-time product was too hot for my taste, but otherwise worked out well.  Had I used one, instead of three, of the small hot peppers that would have been about right for me. Those who like hot foods, would probably think that my recipe was about right. After cooking, the only thing that I found it needed was a little additional salt.  

  Perhaps my only difficulty in cooking the Perlow was not partaking of the traditional Bourbon drinking that traditionally accompanies this activity, and my taste buds were not sufficiently alcohol-dulled to properly enjoy this traditionally hotly seasoned game-camp concoction. I gave it to a more pepper-tolerant friend who pronounced that it rated 5-6 on a 10-point hotness scale  and took it home.

 Ads on this show include SIN’s Synthetic Berry Division’s new blueberries that rely on copper ions fixing in algae from the Berkeley Pit in Beautiful Butte America, Montana, to color this synthetic product an azure blue while retaining the sugar, salt and butter tastes that you crave in a non-nutritive product. As this product is not attacked by bacteria or insects it may be cured hard and strung as colorful beads.

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