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NRA Show Vendors, Lincoln Derringer vs. Zombie Pizza & BBQ, May 7-20, 2012

April 30, 2012
 
 
 

This show may be heard  following its broadcast date by clicking on the following link:  http://webtalkradio.net/shows/hoveys-outdoor-adventures/. If it is not the current show, it is still  available as an archived show and on iTunes.  

 
Derringer pistols figure prominently in this conclusion of the National Rifle Association’s 141st Annual Convention in St. Louis. Not only was Heizer Defense’s  new Double Tap .45 ACP-9mm double-barrel Derringer introduced, but a Davide Pedersoli near-replica of the 1860s Lincoln Derringer is test fired against a life-size Zombie Pizza Delivery Man target. Both accuracy and chronograph information was obtained to determine the operational characteristics of this historic style of gun.
 
Highlighted exhibitors from the show include Olympic Arms with their reintroduced Whitney  pistol, E. Author Brown’s new 6.5mm single-shot rifle, a discussion of drillings from the German Gun Collectors Assoc., H&M’s metal finishing, Cor-Bon/Glaser’s safety slug, Schuetzen (Swiss) black powder and Liberty gun safes. The NRA Eddie Eagle (gun safety for kids) and Firearms for Freedom (what to do with your guns after you die) programs are also described.
 
The Whitney was originally introduced in the 1950s-60s as a sleek-looking sport semi-automatic .22 L.R. pistol. Its rakish lines were a bit too much for a buying public who was only moderately accepting of the Ruger .22 semiauto at the time. Consequently, the company failed. Olympic arms’ version has a polymer frame, but is still a good-looking gun which they also offer in a variety of colors, including pink. Olympic offers a very impressive line of AR 15 platform rifles and 1911s in various configurations and calibers as well as the Whitney handgun.  For more information go to: www.olyarms.com.
 
If any rifle ever told me, “I need to go out and kill an antelope,” this 6.5 mm single-shot did.
 
The E. Author Brown Co. of Garfield, Minnesota, has an extensive line of after-market parts and accessories for popular guns such as the Thompson/Center Encore platform pistol-rifle-shotgun, Ruger’s 10/22 semiauto and Savage bolt-action rifles. What attracted me was their Custom-made 7 lb. scoped falling-block single-shot rifle chambered for a proprietary 6.5 mm Bench Rest Magnum and about 50 other cartridges up to the .30-40 Krag. The 6.5 BRM is a good match for this light-weight rifle and is a tack driver. This round and rifle has taken antelope, deer and elk. It is available with an attached bipod and scope accessories. There is also a pistol built on this action in .44 Remington Magnum and, with a 15-inch barrel, in the 6.5 BRM among other caliber options.
 
Look closely, the small pistol is shown below the table matt.
 
Heizer Defense’s Double Tap Derringer in .45 ACP and 9 mm Luger was introduced at the show in both aluminum and titanium framed models. This is a flat-profile tip-up style double-barreled Derringer is in the general style of the old Remington Double Derringer, but with a double-action-only trigger and chambered for much more powerful cartridges. The trigger pull is long and heavy (12 lbs.) but smooth, and the wide trigger makes it easy to pull. It carries two spare rounds in its grip. Options for the gun include extra barrels for either the .45 or 9 mm, porting to reduce muzzle flip, holsters and carry pouches. The gun weighs 12 or 14 ounces depending on its composition and is 5.5-inches long, 3.9-inches high and .665-inches wide. For more information go to www.heizerdefense.com.
 
16-gauge Sauer&Sohn drilling with a variety of loads, pheasant feathers and squirrel tail on deer hide.
 
The versatile German and Austrian three- and four-barreled drillings and vrillings were displayed by the German Gun Collectors Association. As with the gun shown, some have been re-stocked to American dimensions while the best collectors’ guns have a high degree of engraving and/or stock carving. Caution needs to be exercised with these guns as many of the shotgun chambers are shorter that the 2 3/4-inch U.S. standard, and there is a difference in bullet diameters between the 8X57 JR and 8X57 JRS. The JR uses bullets that are .318-inches in diameter, but the JRS uses the larger .323 bullets. Make sure you use the proper size shotgun shells (or have the chambers lengthened) in your gun and the correct-sized bullets. If you are not sure, do not shoot the gun.  DWM, RWS and Norma make/have made both sizes of 8mm rimmed cartridges.
 
H&M Metal Processing is an Ohio company that impregnates gun metals with black nitride to produce a slick, corrosion resistant thermal-chemical diffusion that does not change the dimensional characteristics of the part, as plaiting does. This finish is available as a black matt, satin or glossy black finish. Not only do they do gun parts, they also treat a variety of industrial products where corrosion and wear resistance are significant factors. Individuals can send their guns in (disassembled) for treatment at a current costs of about $200 for a rifle or pistol. For more information  go to www.blacknitride.com.
 
Schuetzen Powder, LLC is the importer of Swiss black powders in a variety of sizes from Fg (coarse for cannon and very large-bore guns) to FFFFg (very fine for priming flintlocks) and O (zero-grade) superfine priming powder. These powders have a world-wide reputation as being the best available, even through they may cost from $20-$30 a pound in the U.S. As James Kirkland described, “They may be more costly shot to shot, but less costly hit to hit.” Kirkland, who lives in Texas, said that he is apparently a cousin to the Kirklands who own Dixie Gun Works in Tennessee and both share a coincidental interest in black-powder guns.
 
Cor-bon/Glaser has been steadily expanding their line of low-penetrating, low-ricocheting cartridges with compressed interior loads of fine shot to expand within the target or disintegrate upon impact with solid objects. These bullets are now available in popular pistol calibers from the .25 ACP to the .44 Rem. Magnun and even include tactical rifle cartridges such as the .308 Winchester. For information on dealer’s locations and a free DVD go to www.corbon.com.
 
U.S. made high-quality gun safes are produced by Liberty Safe of Payson, Utah. These employ a one-piece box made of U.S. steels and fastened by a bank-vault-like closure with seven to a dozen large steel pins serving to lock the doors. Installation is provided by your local dealer who receives training in safe placement and installation. Dehumidifers are available for all Liberty safes as either built-in units in the larger safes or as  after installation sales.There is storage space on the doors, in shelfs as well as a variety of arrangements of gun racks. To look at the safes go to: www.libertysafe.com.
 
One character known to children at the NRA shows is Eddie Eagle who is part of a gun-safety training program directed to young kids. There are DVDs, coloring books and comic books with this safety message available from the NRA. For more information contact www.nrahq.org/safety/eddie. The NRA can provide both instructional materials and very often speakers on gun safety. Another program goes under the general name of Firearms for Freedom. There are several options available to NRA members who own collections of guns and who have no one to leave them too. These include tax deductible donations, selling the guns and you and your spouse receiving an annuity or collection and sales for estate settlement after you die. For particular information on your situation contact cburgess@nrahq.org.   
 
African hair bracelets were traditionally used to discourage elephants, but Jeff James of www.safarijewelry.com transformed this traditional craft by making bracelets, necklaces and earrings out of copper, gold and silver that mimic the traditional patterns. These bracelets are adjustable because the strands slide through the knots to increase or decrease the item’s size. Prices vary with the spot price of gold and silver and the purity of the alloys used in the item. For up to date information you can call toll free to (800) 597-2327.
 
 
 
Italian Gunmaker Davide Pedersoli makes a near-replica of the Henry Deringer pistol that John Wilkes Booth used to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln. I arranged to obtain one of the guns from Hunter Kirkland at Dixie Gun Works for field testing. This gun was test fired against a Zombie Pizza Delivery Man target, made by Birchwood Casey. Accuracy and chronograph testing provided some useful information about historic and modern uses of this class of self-defense guns. A 15-min. video, “Derringer vs. Pizza Zombie,” is available on YouTube at the wmhoveysmith Channel.
 
Although Booth’s pistol did kill Lincoln, it is a very low-powered gun as witnessed by the Pedersoli’s puny ballistics of 433 fps velocity and 53 ft/lbs of energy at 7-8 yards.  These figures were almost identical to those of the .41 Rimfire cartridge used in the Remington Double Derringer and many others during the late 1800s. A hardwood plank could stop one of these bullets and a man hit with one might ultimately die of septic poisoning, but not before he had beat or stabbed his assailant to death. If you were going to depend on one of these pistols during that time you had best wait until your target was very close and have a knife handy. Booth did and he stabbed Major Henry Rathbone before jumping from the President’s box to the floor of the stage. The gun he used is now on exhibit at the Ford Museum and the bullet is preserved at the National Museum of Health in Washington, D.C. 
 
The cooking section describes how to properly cook whole-hog bar-b-que and make a traditional Brunswick stew, as good bar-b-que proved to be very difficult to find in St. Louis.  
 
Ads on the show include the One-Stop Zombie Shop for all of your zombie needs and the Four Sugar Bread made with four varieties of sugars, four individual grains of wheat, barley, oats and rye in each loaf and sold with flavor packets of Black Strap Molasses or Cane Syrup to supply a minimum of two tablespoons of sugar per slice.  
 
 
 
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