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Hunt Destination, Dawson and Terrell County, Georgia, October 15, 2012

October 2, 2012

The results of a successful hog hunt in the peanut fields of Terrell County, Georgia. Although not as many hogs were seen as usual, four were taken by three hunters during a night hunt.

This show may be heard  following its broadcast date by clicking on the following link:  http://webtalkradio.net/shows/hoveys-outdoor-adventures/. If it is not the current show, it is still  available as an archived show and on iTunes. 

Wild hog hunting with thermal imaging night vision equipment and military-style AR semiautomatic rifles is a departure from my usual muzzleloading and crossbow hunts, but a hunt with Jager Pro’s staff member Lance Hopper provided the opportunity to sample this productive hog-removal method and visit an interesting Southwest Georgia community.

  Jager Pro’s hog removal method consist of  baiting and trapping entire family groups of  hogs, 10-30 at the time, and then doing follow-up hunting during the growing season.  Hogs will feed on almost anything, but particularly like peanuts such as are commercially grown in Southwest Georgia. Jager Pro sells hunting slots that allow visiting hunters to participate and take any hogs that they shoot as well as trapping and shooting equipment.

 

The guns used by Jager Pro are Remington Model 25s AR rifles in .308 Winchester mounted with very expensive thermal imaging scopes. The scopes cost much more than the rifles and these outfits can run $30,000. This contrasted quite strongly with the blunderbuss that I am hunting with this year, as can be seen in the accompanying photo. I joined a hunt with Torbin Wind, from Denmark, and Brandon Stolz from Ephrata, Pennsylvania. The previous evening they had hunted through periods of heavy rain and taken two large sows.

  Lodging and game processing was provided by Dan Redmond of Mossey Creek Outdoors www.mosseycreek.net who operates a lodge a few miles from Dawson. He arranges for deer, hog and small game hunting and may be contacted at (229) 995-4109.  Redmond also provided an interview that explains the mechanics of  an all night hog hunt and how the meat is handled so that it can be in good condition for the hunters to take home.

Painting of a block of old buildings in Dawson, Georgia including the Terrell County Courthouse in the background. This painting is hanging in the Chamber of Commerce office.

Dianne Wimes

   Community information was provided by City Manager Barney Parnacott (229) 995-4444, Chamber of Commerce Director Gina Webb (tccc@windstream.net and a website, www.terrellcountygerogia.org), Albany Technical College Adult Education Instructor, Dianne Wimes (dwimes@albanytech.edu and website www.albanytech.edu ) and Dawson News Editor, Tommy Rountree. More specific information on general hunting opportunities was obtained from DJ Smith, who works at the E-Z Pay hardware store and also guides for the Piney Creek Plantation. This plantation (www.pineycreekplantation.com)  offers day and overnight quail hunting that is done over well-trained dogs and guarantees at least 15 covey rises a day. For more detailed information contact Allen Ingram at (229) 317-3624.

  Dawson, population 5,000,  is located in a largely agricultural region of Georgia between the cities of Albany (15 miles) and Americus (30 miles).  It has road and rail access, abundant groundwater resources, natural gas availability, clean air and a quiet setting with easy access to health, advanced education and cultural facilities of the nearby cities. Because it is located between two major river systems and well away from coastal areas, there is no significant hazard from flooding or hurricanes. Land prices are inexpensive, taxes are reasonable  and the county welcomes environmentally responsable industrial development.

  Hunting, fishing, golf and other recreational activities are abundant within the county and nearby. This would be an ideal location for those who have become use to Florida, but  desire to remove themselves from coastal areas to avoid the hurricanes and flooding that have become increasingly common aspects of  Florida weather.

  On the cooking section Grandon Stolz and I discuss the finer points of  making scrapple and head cheese. The cooking section is brought to you by SIN, Inc. (Synthetic Industrial Non-Nutritives, Inc.) who makes eatables from the best of coal-tar, petroleum and agricultural waste products. Using its basic raw material, glop, any pork product from hams to ribs can be fabricated to provide the butter, salt and sugar tastes that you crave from an all-synthetic product.

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. Rudy permalink
    October 2, 2012 12:47 pm

    Awesome pics, congratulations. Hovey feel free to post Hog pics

    From my Android phone on T-Mobile. The first nationwide 4G network.

  2. October 8, 2012 2:00 am

    You should check out http://hogpredators.com Hogpredators Guided Night Vision Hog Hunting in Georgia.

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